Oregon

Washington State’s Own Stonehenge

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Stonehenge at Maryhill

Stonehenge in England is surrounded by theories and speculation. It’s fun to try to think about what the circle of stones really meant and why it was created. But Stonehenge in Maryhill, Washington has a definite known reason and purpose.

This full-size replica of the stone structure was built by Samuel Hill, a businessman, and was finished in 1929. It is however, not made out of stone, but out of concrete. Its purpose is to honor those who died in World War I. The names of soldiers from Klickitat County are engraved on markers. It is also the very first Memorial to World War I Veterans in the entire United States.

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Hill had heard that the original Stonehenge was thought to have been created as a sacrificial place, so he envisioned the Maryhill Stonehenge as a tribute to those who were sacrificed in war.

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There are 40 stones on the inside circle and 30 stones on the outside. As the original Stonehenge marks the solstice, so does the Maryhill one. The Altar Stone is aligned to the sunrise on the Summer Solstice.

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Altar Stone in the center

Standing in different parts of Stonehenge the sun throws shadows that look both beautiful and intriguing. It’s interesting to stand there for awhile and watch the shadows move with the sun.

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Shadows

Maryhill Stonehenge sits high on a bluff above the Columbia River in the Columbia Gorge. The view is spectacular every way you look. On the beautiful spring day we were there, the sky was deep blue and the grass was still green, not having turned brown yet from the heat.

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The Columbia River and Gorge

With no mountains to block the view, you can see west to Mt. Hood.

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Sam Hill Memorial Bridge and Mt. Hood off to the left

Looking down on the river you may see fishing boats, speed boats or even barges and tug boats transporting their goods upriver. You can see the Sam Hill Memorial Bridge crossing the Columbia River to the town of Biggs on the Oregon side. In a time-warp feeling of old vs. new, wind turbines can be seen on the Washington hills north of Stonehenge.

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Wind Turbines

There is no cost to visit the memorial and it is open from 7am to dusk.

Directions: On the Washington side of the Columbia River, go east on Hwy. 14 and follow the signs to Stonehenge.

On the Oregon go east on Hwy. 84 to exit 104 and the Sam Hill Memorial Bridge at Biggs, Oregon. Take it north, crossing onto Hwy. 14 and continuing east following the signs to Stonehenge.

 

Categories: Historical, Keatons Out and About, Oregon, Outdoors, Parks, Roadside Attraction, Uncategorized, Washington | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Learning About Fish: Bonneville Fish Hatchery, Oregon

 

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White Sturgeon – he’s looking at you!

When would you guess that the Bonneville Fish Hatchery in Cascade Locks, Oregon was built? 1990’s? 1970’s? During the hippy days of the 1960’s? Would you believe it was 1909?! I was very surprised because I didn’t think hatcheries came into existence until much more recently in response to dams and concerns about endangered fish. But this one was built as a rearing site for eggs that were received from other hatcheries. At that time it was known as “Central Hatchery”. The hatchery sits on Tanner Creek, which flows into the Columbia River. In 1930 it was expanded to be able to hold 11 million salmon. It was expanded again in 1978 and again in 1998. The facilities are built on the site where Lewis and Clark camped on April 9, 1806!

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Bonneville Fish Hatchery Grounds

We spent one recent spring day there and it was heartwarming to see so many other families there introducing their children to the fish and learning about conservation and the lives of fish. The beautifully manicured grounds is very welcoming. You can pick up a free tour guide that will lead you around the facility and tell you all about it and what fish are in each pond or “battery” as some of the rearing ponds are called.

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Fish “Batteries”

There are beautiful Rainbow Trout ponds.

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Trout!

You can even feed the fish. There are vending machines and for a small price you can buy food and toss it to the fish and watch them snap it up very quickly.

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Josh feeding the trout

The White Sturgeon Pond was amazing! The fish are the size of a tree trunk! You can watch them swimming lazily through the water from above, or go down below into a view area and feel like they are swimming straight towards you. Kids love to see how the Sturgeon look like they have their bones on the outside of their body. They’re very majestic looking fish though, and you can’t help but stare at them for a very long time.

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White Sturgeon next to tree trunk

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Sturgeon Viewing Room

You can also see the Egg Incubation Building which is on the National Historic Register and includes a Visitor Information Center.

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Incubator Building

There is another small Visitor Center in the building that holds the offices for the Hatchery. You can also see the Spawning Room in that building and view a 12-minute video explaining spawning.1-IMG_3259

Finally, you have to stop at the Oregon Wildlife Bonneville Gift Shop where they have a lot of souvenirs and wildlife conservation items to choose from. All proceeds benefit fish and wildlife projects.

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Gift Shop

To help you plan your visit you can see the Tour Guide here: http://www.dfw.state.or.us/resources/visitors/docs/Bonneville_Hatchery_Self-guided_Tour.pdf

From April to August the hatchery is open from 7:30am-8pm. September and October hours are 7:30am-7pm. November to March it’s open from 7:30-5pm.

Getting there: Take I-84 east from Portland to exit 40 Bonneville Dam/Fish Hatchery and just follow the signs.

Categories: Historical, Keatons Out and About, Oregon, Outdoors, Parks, Roadside Attraction | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Firefighters on the Butte: Watchers and Teachers

Fire Smoke

Fire in the lava “island”

Smoke in the distance. In the Bend, Oregon area this happens rather regularly. When that happens while we are visiting we like to drive up to a little cinder cone south of town because it has such a fantastic view, probably a couple of hundred miles.

This time when we got to the top, we saw a US Forest Service fire truck and several firefighters. They weren’t in fire gear, just wearing blue uniforms. Ironically, when we were here eight years previously, there was also a thunder and lightening storm and when it was over we went to this same cinder cone and there were firefighters on lookout then as well!

We stepped out of the truck to take pictures. The fire was an impressive sight from up there. It was in the “lava island” at Lava Lands Visitor Center (see the article posted March 24). We could see the smoke actually billowing up. We went up to talk to the fire crew, and one of them started explaining everything to us – which fire that was, why they were letting it burn, that there was significant lightening expected that day, that they had just gotten back from fighting the fire at Warm Springs. Anything we asked he answered and more.

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Keeping watch

We somehow started discussing timber management and the differences in how timber grows on the coast and how it grows here. He told us that the trees are supposed to be close there but here they are naturally spaced about 40 feet apart. He said low underbrush naturally grows here and when a fire starts it burns just that lower part and doesn’t reach the canopy so the trees survive. He explained to us that past poor management over-planted the trees so now they are closer together. The firefighters are trying to play catch-up by thinning some trees but this is also a controversial practice politically.

He also explained that the practice of NOT putting out fires has been detrimental as it has allowed low undergrowth to get taller, and when it catches fire now it can reach the canopy and kill the trees as well. He believed he knows proper management techniques that would make the forests healthier as well as cost MUCH less and save taxpayer money, but that, again, politics interferes.

While he was explaining all this, he was also kind enough to open one of the equipment doors on the fire truck and took out a whiteboard marker and illustrated the tree and undergrowth for us. It was really quite educational!

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Fire truck “white board”

Josh made himself at home while we were being “educated”. He talked to the other crew members, and they allowed him to climb on fire truck to take pictures from that vantage point.

Just before we left a state police pickup pulled up just to check on the crew and find out what they were seeing. He also told them that that a woman he talked to was a little panicked when she saw the smoke because she thought a volcano was going off!

We wondered how long that crew stayed up on that cinder cone watching for fires. We really appreciated their willingness to welcome us and take their time to educate us – and we were especially grateful for the job they do to protect beautiful Central Oregon.

 

Categories: Keatons Out and About, Oregon, Outdoors | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Islands in the Lava? – Lava Lands Visitor Center, Bend, Oregon

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“Islands” of trees in the lava

Lava Lands Visitor Center is located about eight miles south of Bend, Oregon on Hwy. 97. There is a very small interpretive center, bookstore, trails, restrooms and picnic tables. The site is set up for visitors to Central Oregon to learn all about the volcanic history of the area known as the Newberry National Volcanic Monument.

Lava Butte is the focal point of this spot. The lava flow from this butte spreads out over nine miles in this area. There are “islands” of trees in the flow. “Islands” is the term the locals use. When we first arrived there was a fire from lightening and the news kept reporting that the fire was in an island in the lava flow. We wondered what that meant and finally found out when we visited the site.

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More “islands”

To see this spectacular scene you can either walk one of the trails up to the top of Lava Butte or drive up in a car. There are only 10 parking spots, so when you enter the lower facility you are given a time slot and told where to park and wait. Then when it’s your turn you can start driving up to the butte (there is no cost for this part). It’s actually quite close and doesn’t seem very tall, at only 500 feet. The drive up is unique as it follows a beautiful red lava rock road that first weaves through a lava bed, then spirals up the hill.

Road up to top of the butte

Road up to top of the butte

Once parked in the parking lot, you can take a short, but rather steep walk up to the working Forest Service lookout. Inside the bottom floor of the lookout are displays on the walls above each window explaining each geologic feature you are seeing out that particular window. That’s when I realized there are a heck of a lot of buttes and mountains around there!

The views up here there are amazing! For such a short butte, you can see very far.

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Amazing views!

There are two trails – The Trail of Molten Land and the Trail of the Whispering Pines – where you can take a leisurely stroll through the area, enjoying more views and looking for critters. What great names for trails!

Nothing cuter than critters!

Can’t resist the critters!

David enjoyed the walk on the trail.

David enjoyed the walk on the trail. Notice the lookout behind him.

After checking out the butte and the trails, you really need to stop in the visitor center and see the educational and interesting displays. There are four different short movies shown during the day that explain the different volcanic processes so they are worth seeing in order to learn more.

Lava Lands Visitor Center is a quick stop to visit while in the Central Oregon area, but an important stop that will help you understand the geology you are seeing. When you learn the story of how the landscape was created through such violent earth processes, you can’t help but view it in a different light and appreciation.

Lava Lands Visitor Center is a Forest Service Fee site so it costs $5 for the day or the $30 annual pass is valid there.

Lava Lands Visitor Center
58201 South Hwy. 97
Bend, OR 97707
(541) 593-2421

 

Categories: Keatons Out and About, Oregon, Outdoors, Parks | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Cartlandia!

1-CartlandiaSignAhhh, the enticing aromas of BBQ, Thai, Asian, Gyros, Chicken and Waffles and more. This must be Cartlandia!

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Just a few of the carts at Cartlandia

If you think it sounds like the TV series, Portlandia, you are correct. Cartlandia is a food cart area located in Portland, Oregon. Portland is becoming very well known for its food carts so of course we had to check them out. We were told about a couple of different areas where there were food carts so we drove around looking for them. Then we found one full block of carts. First we had to walk all the way around and see what all they had available, and boy, did they have a variety to offer. We wanted to sample a couple of items, but not eat full meals so we could keep sampling. The only problem was, this is Oregon, so it was pouring down rain. There was no place to sit and eat and we hate eating in the car. So we stood under the overhang of one of the closed carts and ate as quickly as we could. Then took off to look for Cartlandia.

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Voodoo Doughnuts!

We found 82nd and followed it until we found Cartlandia at 8145 SE 82nd Avenue. It was off to the west side of the street and in a parking lot with a fence around it. It had a sign on the side of the building letting us know we were in the right place! The first thing we all noticed though was the bright pink cart – Voodoo Doughnuts has a cart there! Woohoo! But solid food first.

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Grandson Anden and Daughter Brandy Getting BBQ

So we split up and all looked around at the carts to see what delights we could partake in here. There were not as many carts as the other site, but still enough variety to make us all happy. We all chose our food then went to the best part of Cartlandia – the Beer Garden!

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Wine, Beer & Pulled Pork

It’s a huge, warm, dry tent where we could sit and eat. And they served beer and wine! What could be better? It even has a big-screen TV like a sports bar. But kids are also welcome there so we sat with our individual choices of delicious delectables and enjoyed a leisurely meal in the warmth of the tent. That alone made Cartlandia stand out from the other carts.

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Beer Garden/Tent

I’m sure it’s great to hit the food carts on a warm sunny day, but it’s nice to know that Cartlandia is prepared for Oregon weather by providing the tent. While on this particular day there wasn’t as many carts as the other site, I imagine that during the better weather there would be more to choose from as the website says they have 28 food carts. And again the tent with seating and shade from the sun would be a welcome relief.

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Beer Garden with TV!

It’s also next to the Springwater Corridor trail, a bicycle trail that runs throughout Portland. So you can take a nice long bike ride and stop and replenish your energy quickly and easily. There is plenty of room for bikes along with parking spots for 50 cars.

If you want to have a really different birthday party or special day, you can even book your event at Cartlandia!

To find out more about Cartlandia and the different foods that may be available there, check out their website at http://www.cartlandia.com

Categories: Bicycle Trail, Food and Wine, Keatons Out and About, Oregon, Outdoors, Roadside Attraction | Tags: , , , , | 2 Comments

For The Kid in All of Us: Rock and Gem Shows

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OAMS Rock Show

Besides actually going out and collecting rocks, rock and gem shows are a great way to get kids interested in rockhounding. They can see all the different kinds of beautiful rocks and the variety of colors. That can help them visualize what they are actually looking for when they are out collecting.

Over President’s Day holiday we went to Portland, Oregon to check out the rock show sponsored by the Oregon Agate and Mineral Society. We took my grandson, Anden, because he likes rock collecting and it has been the joy of my life to share my passion with him.

The show was held inside the OMSI (Oregon Museum of Science and Industry) hall and admission was free. While it was probably the smallest show I have ever been to, it was still packed with amazing specimens to see, rock-related items to buy, and demonstrations.

When we first walked in we were greeted with a “food table” – every item on the table looked like food but was actually some sort of rock. It was quite impressive. At another table young girls were making painted rocks and creating other crafts from rocks. There was a table with various rocks on it called the “Touch Table” to let kids know they should pick those rocks up and touch them all they wanted!

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Rock “Food”

The table with samples of meteorites was a new experience for us. We had never seen one and were able to touch them and feel how heavy they were. There were little magnets available so we could see how magnetic the rocks were. They really looked quite different than I expected and I’m not sure I would recognize one out in the field if I came across it.

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Meteorite with Magnet

At the back of the room were the demonstrations. That’s where we met 11-year-old Zach Taylor. He was making cabochons for guests. A cabochon is a piece of rock that is most often formed into an oblong piece that is then polished. It can then be placed into a necklace or other piece of jewelry. It was impressive to watch Zac expertly run the “Genie,” a grinding and polishing machine that has six wheels of varying roughness to shape the rock, then polish the scratches out, then finish polishing the stone. The finished product is truly a work of art.

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Young Rockhounder Zach Taylor

Zach has always been interested in rock collecting and joined the Oregon Agate and Mineral Society about three years ago. One of the other members worked with Zach for a couple of months teaching him how to use the equipment and Zach has now been making cabochons for about two years. The field trips or “expeditions” as they call them, are what really get Zach excited. Zach and his mom, Mary, are excited for the next club field trip which will be to Lincoln City, Oregon to collect agates. This club really knows how to involve the kids!

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Josh’s Finds

Moving on in the room, down the outside row of tables were vendors selling small slabs of various specimen of rocks. Josh had a great time picking out some great pieces to add to his collection. Another activity for kids was the “wheel” and for 50 cents kids could spin the wheel to win from a selection of rocks or rock pieces of art. Both Josh and Anden, spun the wheel several times. Anden was thrilled with his winnings but also “needed” to buy something. All those beautiful rocks are hard to resist! He saw a quartz crystal that he really wanted so of course Grandma bought it for him.

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Anden and His Crystal

At the far side of the room were display cases with gorgeous collections. One of my favorites was the picture jasper just because I think it is amazing you can find rocks, cut and polish them, and they really do look like intricately painted pictures!

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Picture Jasper

My other favorite collection was the sunstones. Sunstones are the state rock of Oregon, and there is land set aside in the southeast part of Oregon, outside of the town of Plush, where you can go to collect them for free. They are quite abundant so I would say you are guaranteed to find stones.

Sunstones

Rockhounding is a great way to connect with kids and to get them outside. It’s great for the kid in the rest of us as well!

There are many rock clubs all over the country, several in every state. And there are many rock and gem shows that you can attend.

Categories: Oregon, Outdoors, Rockhounding/Gold Panning | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Columbia River, Transportation Giant

big2_2Last weekend we decided to take a day trip to Astoria, Oregon for a quick getaway. There is a quite a bit to see and do there, but this particular day one fascinating thing was watching all the container ships in the Columbia River. I’ve seen them before, but never so many.

The Columbia River is the biggest river in the Pacific Northwest at 1243 miles long. It starts in Canada, flows south through Washington, then turns west and is the border between Oregon and Washington. There are 14 dams on the river.

Ships coming into the Columbia River have to pass over the bar, which can be treacherous in bad weather. The bar is where the mighty Columbia River meets the powerful Pacific Ocean, creating enormous waves. It is so dangerous that ships must have a Columbia River Bar Pilot (experts in crossing the bar) get on the boat and guide it through the bar.

Once over the bar they then pass under the Astoria-Megler Bridge which was built in 1966 and is 208 feet high.  Upriver the ships also have to pass under the Lewis and Clark Bridge at Longview which is 198 feet high. The Columbia River is 55 feet deep for the first 5 miles, then is 43 feet deep for the next 100 miles or so into Portland, Oregon. Neither of those depths seems like enough when you look at how absolutely HUGE the ships are that are in it!big1_1

About 3600 ships go through the Columbia River every year. Most of the particular ships we saw this day were Articulated Tug and Barges, basically a combination tug boat and barge. The tug can be detached from the barge if needed. I believe we also saw some General Cargo Ships which can carry logs or large amounts of other cargo.

We watched the large group anchored up out in the bay from the dock around the Columbia River Maritime Museum. They were just sitting there, no action, but just fascinating to see so many of them sitting out there lined up. You can see from the amount of red showing above the water that the ships are empty. We assumed they would be heading upriver at some point to load up with cargo. When they are fully loaded and heavy, they sit much lower in the water and the red part is nearly covered.

IMG_2813We went to Fort Stevens and that’s where we saw this ship heading back out to sea. As you can see from the small amount of red showing above the water line, this ship is loaded and heavy. Surprisingly, though, it moved amazingly quick even though it was loaded up.

Watching the boats we wondered – what kind of people worked on the boats, where were they from, where were they going, what kind of cargo did they carry, would we be using any of the items they were bringing in and out? We’ll never know but it was fascinating to see the importance of the great Columbia River as a massive transportation system and the amount of traffic using it.

Categories: Historical, Keatons Out and About, Oregon, Outdoors | Tags: , , , , | 6 Comments

The Original Taco House – Portland, Oregon

In my last post, I wrote about eating before we hit Voodoo Doughnuts, and said I would tell about it in a later post. So here it is.

Taco House OutsideYes, there are probably more “authentic” Mexican food restaurants, but the Original Taco House was the first Mexican restaurant in Portland that was open year round, so how can it really be beat?

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David really loves The Original Taco House so when we recently had an opportunity to be in the area, he followed his nose and took us right to it. Actually, he ate there about 30 years ago when he was living in Portland. At that time it was cafeteria style, where you got your tray and went down the line picking out what you wanted.  You can see from the pictures that it is still set up like that, but now it is regular sit-and-serve style.

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It opened in 1960, owned by Gene and Natha Waddle. They also owned and ran Waddle’s restaurant located in Jantzen Beach just off I-5. Waddle’s restaurant is now gone, but the Taco House is now ran by the Waddle’s grandsons.

On my first visit I was apprehensive. There are so many foods/textures/spices I don’t like. So when I asked the waitress what was in the burrito meat, she brought me a sample so I could see and taste. I really appreciated that because other places when I have asked that they said nothing else was in it and when I got it it was filled with peppers and onions. Note to restaurants – peppers and onions ARE something besides beef. So I ordered and devoured a beef and bean burrito and David thoroughly enjoyed his Mini Grande Tostada. Josh was in heaven with the huge enchilada and taco combo.

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The restaurant is decorated in typical Mexican restaurant fashion, although the fireplace at the end of the room is a little out of place for the décor. But, hey, in the Pacific Northwest, not many of us are going to complain about a fireplace.

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The staff is very friendly and helpful. The portions are HUGE and delicious. You can get as bland as you want, the way I eat, or as spicy as you like. There’s quite a variety of foods, even gluten-free if you need it. Of course I added a Strawberry Daiquiri to my meal, a drink so cold the outside of the glass was frosty. Yum!

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(Photo by Brandy Kirkendall)

While it may have to compete with tons of other Mexican restaurants in the Portland area now, it says a lot about a restaurant if it still sticks in your mind 30 years later. The only problem now is that David wants to eat there every time we go to Portland!

The Original Taco House has three locations, two in Portland and one in Vancouver. This one is located at 3005 SE Powell Blvd. Portland, Oregon. It’s open every day from 11am-10pm. (503) 234-6401

http://www.originaltacohouse.com/

Categories: Food and Wine, Keatons Out and About, Oregon | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

That Voodoo That You Do So Well – Voodoo Doughnuts, Portland, Oregon

1-IMG_25521-IMG_2565Who doesn’t love a good donut? Who can’t love a GREAT donut? Then if you are ever in Portland, Oregon you have to go to Voodoo Doughnuts! There are two locations, one at 22 SW 3rd Street and one at 1501 NE Davis Street. The one on 3rd is very small. I didn’t even see inside. There were two very long lines outside of it. We were around the corner waiting for my daughter who had an appointment in a photography studio. We kept seeing people walk by with big pink boxes. Josh, who can smell a donut a mile away, kept shouting, “Voodoo donuts!” We thought he was nuts (well, he is), but then David walked around the corner and it was right there. We walked over there and yep, there it was, and a lot of people were coming out of this little bitty storefront with boxes of donuts. People were lined up two different ways to get in – I never could quite figure out how the two lines looked. But I had heard of this place and that the lines were long and that’s why many people go to the other location. Since we weren’t ready for donuts yet (we needed to eat a solid lunch first) we just looked at the crowd and left.

In case you have never heard of Voodoo Doughnuts, you need to watch an episode of “Man vs. Food” on the Travel Channel. Adam Rich made a visit to the one that we intended to go to, and he thoroughly enjoyed his visit and the donuts. It truly is TV worthy!

1-IMG_25491-IMG_2554After a delicious lunch at a Portland-location-to-be-discussed-in-a-later-post, this was our first visit during daytime hours. When we have visited later in the evening there was not a big line. There was a bit of a line today but it moved quickly since there were three staff helping out. You actually keep pretty entertained looking at all the voodoo themed artwork, clothing, and decorations.1-IMG_2568

When it’s finally your turn, it’s almost overwhelming – you want them all! Beautiful fluffy donuts with thick frosting, smelling amazing! All shapes and colors. Old fashioned donuts, fritters, maple bars, bacon maple bars, donuts covered in Cocoa Puffs or sporting a piece of bubble gum. Pretty much if you can imagine it, it’s there. Of course, they have the voodoo-shaped donuts, filled with blood (OK it’s really a cream) but kids love this one.

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One thing to be aware of if you avoid gluten, eggs, nuts, soy, etc. there are no special anything-free donuts available. We typically avoid wheat and sugar in our daily diets but since we only get to Portland a couple of times a year, we allow ourselves to indulge in Voodoo Doughnuts while we are there. They are so worth it and put all other donut shops to shame.

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Daughter, Brandy and her boyfriend, Jason. It was his first visit. He was drooling…

For more information on Voodoo Doughnuts, see their website at http://voodoodoughnut.com/index.php

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Categories: Food and Wine, Keatons Out and About, Oregon | Tags: , , , , | 2 Comments

Upcoming Santa Snow Trains

Snow, trains, Santa and Christmas time – who doesn’t love the combination? Luckily here in the northwest there are several snow trains to take advantage of in the coming weeks.

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Alki Tours Snow Train to Leavenworth Tree Lighting Festival

www.alkitours.com

Musicians, magicians, breakfast and dinner on this trip to and from the Bavarian-themed town of Leavenworth.

Prices are $139 for children and $149 for adults.

  • Saturdays, December 7, 14 & 21

 

Chehalis-Centralia Railroad and Museum Chehalis, Washington

http://steamtrainride.com/holiday_trains/

Santa Steam Train (30 minutes)

Visit with Santa and have your picture taken

Price is $10 (under 2 free)

  • Weekends, December 7 through December 15

Polar Express Train (hour and a half)

Santa, cookies, hot chocolate and a reading of the book Polar Express

Price is $20 for children, $30 for adults

  • Fridays through Sundays, November 29 – Sunday, December 22

 

Chelatchie Prairie Railroad Yacolt, Washington Christmas Tree Special Train

http://www.bycx.com/schedule

Prices range from $8-$11 for children ages 2-4, $10-$13 for children ages 5-12 an $15-$18 for adults.

  • Weekends, December 1 through December 22

 

Lake Whatcom Railway Wickersham, Washington Santa Train

http://www.lakewhatcomrailway.com/

Prices are $12.50 for children, $25 for adults

  • Saturdays, December 7, 14, & 21

 

Mount Rainier Scenic Railroad Elbe, Washington Santa Express Train

http://www.mrsr.com/index.html

Visit Santa and drink hot chocolate while riding along the foothills of Mt. Rainier!

Prices are $22 for children ages 2-12, and $27 for adults.

  • Fridays through Sundays, December 6 – December 22

 

Northern Pacific Railway Museum Toppenish, Washington Toy Train Christmas with Santa

http://www.nprymuseum.org/toytrainchristmas.htm

A unique experience that involves playing with lots of toy trains! A short train ride on a caboose is included.

Prices are $4 for children and $6 for adult.

  • Weekends, November 30 –  December 22

 

Northwest Railroad Museum Snoqualmie, Washington Santa Train

http://www.trainmuseum.org/index.php/visit-us/santa-train

A beautiful old train depot and museum, Santa, and cocoa!

Prices are $20 for everyone.

  • Weekends, November 30 through  December 21

 

OREGON

Oregon Mount Hood Railroad Hood River, Oregon Polar Express Train Saturday

https://www.mthoodrr.com/buy-polar-tickets.html

Caroling, hot chocolate, Santa, and a special treat!

Prices range from $18-$38 for children and $26 to $46 for adults.

  • November 9  – December 29

 

Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad Garibaldi, Oregon Candy Cane Express Train

http://www.ocsr.net/candycane.html

Ride along the Pacific Ocean with Santa! Cookies, candy, and hot chocolate!

Prices are $15 for ages 3-10 and $20 for adults.

  • December 7 – December 15

 

Sumpter Valley Railroad McEwen & Sumpter, Oregon Christmas Train

http://www.sumptervalleyrailroad.org/special-events.html

Ride a steam-powered train back in time!

  • December 7 – 15

 

IDAHO

Idaho Thunder Mountain Line Horseshoe Bend, Idaho Santa Express Train

http://www.thundermountainline.com

Christmas music, coloring books, pictures with Santa, Santa’s Magic Forest, candy canes, and milk! Prices range from $20-$30 for children and $30-$40 for adults.

  • Fridays through Sundays, November 22 – December 22

 

MONTANA

Charlie Russell Chew Choo Lewistown, Montana North Pole Adventure Train

http://www.montanadinnertrain.com/schedule.html

Prices are $25 per person

  • Weekends, November 30 through December 21.
Categories: Festivals, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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